Robert Clark@robertclarkphoto

Photographer/director

www.theobservers.co/blog-people-s2/robert-clark

2,269 posts 569,128 followers 1,223 following

Robert Clark

Looking back at pictures I shot for @natgeo, a model is wearing a headset equipped with EEG-sensing frame which is set up to receive data placed at critical points on the skull. The hand is a #prototype #bionic limb which can be controlled by the data collected and processed from the headset. @OpenBci makes the headset itself, as well as the board and software the deciphers the information received from the electrodes. #openbci #android


6

Robert Clark

A few pictures of two of the people who a make my Father’s Day Special for me. My Daughter Lola, Lola and my dad Russ Clark and finally, me and my dad at my college graduation 34 years ago. Love you both beyond.


26

Robert Clark

I was able to photograph some of the finches that Charles Darwin collected in the Galapagos as aprt of a story about trying to "See like Darwin".
But I just ran across this interesting an disturbing article. Darwin’s Finches Are In Danger Because a Parasite Is Changing Their Mating Song
By deforming their beaks, an introduced parasite is causing two finch species to hybridize, changing the course of their evolution.

Parasites usually impact individual health—they suck your blood or take your food. Sometimes, the really bad ones kill you. In a little island in the Galapagos, a parasite is doing even more: it’s changing evolution.
According to a new study from researchers at Flinders University in Australia, a parasite is attacking the beaks of two finches—the small tree finch ( C. parvulus) and the critically endangered medium tree finch ( C. pauper). Darwin made these finches famous on his voyage to the Galapagos, as they helped him come up with his theory of evolution. Now, a parasitic larvae is making them evolve in new ways. It’s changing their mating song, confusing female finches so much that they sometimes mate with the wrong species of finch. A new species is being created: a hybrid of those two birds.

The larvae of Philornis downsi, a tiny fly introduced to the Galapagos in the 1960s. The fly larvae hides inside the beaks of the finches, eating the blood and tissue from the inside out. These flies can completely change the beak shape, nearly doubling nostril size. In severe cases, the beak will end up open on both sides, meaning its whole nasal cavity is missing.
The finches sing to attract mates, and any change to their beaks has serious implications for their songs. In their paper, which was published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, scientists said that birds with beaks deformed by parasites have more deviation in their songs. Normally, these two finches have totally unique calls, which helps to announce their eligibility to potential mates. When these males change their songs, it confuses females. @NatGeo #NatGeo #CharlesDarwin #Evolution #EvolutionaryBiology


37

Robert Clark

A child perhaps in his or her early teens rests in a mass burial site of #PampalaCruz on the arid coast of northern #Peru. They are among the 269 children who were sacrificed and buried around 1450 CE at two sites near #ChanChan, the ancient capital of the #Chimú people. Most of the victims were killed with a cut to the chest, possibly to remove the heart, and buried in simple shrouds.

Gabriel Prieto, #GabrielPrieto a professor of #archaeology from the National University of #Trujillo, peers into the grave and nods. “Ninety-five,” he announces. He’s keeping a running tally of victims, and this one, labeled E95, is the 95th dug up since he first began investigating the mass burial site in 2011. The grim count from this and a second sacrifice site nearby will ultimately add up to 269 children between the ages of five and 14 and three adults. All of the victims perished more than 500 years ago in carefully orchestrated acts of ritual sacrifice that may be unprecedented in world history.
“This is something completely unexpected,” exclaims Prieto, shaking his head in bewilderment. The words have become a kind of mantra as the archaeologist and father struggles to make sense of the harrowing discovery at a site called Huanchaquito-Las Llamas. In our time and culture, the violent death of even one child rends all but the most callous hearts, and the specter of mass murder horrifies every healthy mind. And so, we wonder: What desperate circumstances might account for an act that’s unthinkable to us today?
Words by @natgeo Shot on assignment for @natgeo


34

Robert Clark

Another of my mummy pictures for a book/exhibit project. A #mummy for the northern coast of #Peru.


19

Robert Clark

Nearly as tall as a giraffe and with the wingspan of an F-16 fighter, Quetzalcoatlus northropi was one of the largest flying animals of all time. This life-size model, being painted by @_jimBurt_ at Blue Rhino Studio, @bluerhinostudio, is bound for a cultural center in Kuwait

Bristling with teeth for catching fish, this Anhanguera piscator fossil retains its true-to-life shape—a prize for paleontologists. Its skull and other bones were found in a fossil-rich region of Brazil.


79

Robert Clark

One the wonderful parts of the #Viking story was the distances that they traveled, they stole gold, silver & silk from the territories around the #CaspianSea, it is hard to imagine sailing into the ocean in a 50’ longboat on #worldoceansday. Do you think you could or would have taken that trip? They reached North America in 986 CE & sail along the #Russian River as well as the #ShetlandIslans, Some believe they may have reached #SouthAmerica.


30

Robert Clark

A set of images from my coverage for a story on Vikings for @natgeo. Some times it is nice to see ones pictures in black and white. #uphellyaa2019 #burial-mound


35

Robert Clark

Always nice to see some of your work published in a beautiful and loving way. @phaidonsnaps makes amazing books, I was lucky enough to have them publish my book, #evolutionavisualrecord. So I was very happy to receive two different books produced by @phaidonsnaps. One on the animal kingdom and the other on plants. They are really perfect gifts. In the animal book I have a picture of the tail of a crocodile and the plants book a picture of Orchid Darwinious. It is a flower from #Madagascar. Upon seeing the flower #charlesdarwin theorized that the long throat on the flower meant that a dry flying moth existed with a long enough proboscis to pollinate the #Orchid. #Evolution #evolutionarybiology


21

Robert Clark

This video is of Cardiff, Wales which has the second largest tidal differential on the planet. Hidden under water are signs of a former world, a human foot print that is 10,000 years old.
WHEN SIGNS OF a lost world at the bottom of the North Sea first began to appear, no one wanted to believe them. The evidence started to surface a century and a half ago, when fishermen along the Dutch coast widely adopted a technique called beam trawling. They dragged weighted nets across the seafloor and hoisted them up full of sole, plaice, and other bottom fish. But sometimes an enormous tusk would spill out and clatter onto the deck, or the remains of an aurochs, woolly rhino, or other extinct beast. The fishermen were disturbed by these hints that things were not always as they are. What they could not explain, they threw back into the sea.
Generations later a resourceful amateur paleontologist named Dick Mol persuaded the fishermen to bring him the bones and note the coordinates of where they had found them. In 1985 one captain brought Mol a beautifully preserved human jawbone, complete with worn molars. With his friend, fellow amateur Jan Glimmerveen, Mol had the bone radiocarbon-dated. It turned out to be 9,500 years old, meaning the individual lived during the Mesolithic period, which in northern Europe began at the end of the last ice age some 12,000 years ago and lasted until the advent of farming 6,000 years later. “We think it comes from a burial,” says Glimmerveen. “One that has lain undisturbed since that world vanished beneath the waves, about 8,000 years ago.”
A similar metamorphosis took place at #Goldcliff on the Severn estuary in Wales, where archaeologist Martin Bell from the University of Reading and his team have been excavating for 21 years. In the Mesolithic, a narrow, incised valley initially contained the River Severn. As the sea rose, the river spilled over the valley’s sides and spread out—perhaps within as little as a century—creating the outlines of the modern estuary. At some point the estuary would have been dotted with islands. On assignment for @natgeo


12

Robert Clark

Another burial a @NatGeo story on Doggerland who's existence was first suggested in a late 19th-century book “A Story of the Stone Age” by H.G. Wells, set in a prehistoric region where one might have walked dryshod from Europe to Britain.
The landscape was a diverse mix of gentle hills, marshes, wooded valleys and swamps. #Mesolithic people took advantage of #Doggerland’s rich migrating wildlife and seasonal hunting grounds that has been evident in the ancient bones and tools embedded on the present sea floor brought to the surface by fishing trawlers.
Over time, the area was flooded by rising sea levels after the last #glacial period around 6,500 to 6,200BC. Melting water that had been locked away caused the land to tilt in an isostatic adjustment as the huge weight of ice lessened.


13

Robert Clark

Murdered, then buried together, two women from a Mesolithic cemetery on Téviec Island in #Brittan, #France, pay witness to a violent age.Did the rising tide bring neighboring populations into conflict?
In an area known as Doggerland was an area of land, now submerged beneath the southern #NorthSea, that connected Great Britain to continental Europe. It was flooded by rising sea levels around 6,500–6,200 BC. It was a rich habitat with human habitation in the Mesolithic period, although rising sea levels gradually reduced it to low-lying islands before its final submergence, possibly following a tsunami caused by the Storegga Slide.The bodies had been buried with great care in a pit that was partly dug into the ground and covered over with debris. They had been protected by a roof made of antlers and provided with a number of grave pieces of flint and boar bones, with jewelry made of seashells drilled and assembled into necklaces, bracelets, and ringlets for the legs. #Doggerland was named in the 1990s, after the Dogger Bank, which in turn was named after the 17th-century Dutch fishing boats called doggers.The above individuals of Téviec or #Théviec is an island situated to the west of the isthmus of the peninsula of Quiberon, near #Saint-Pierre-Quiberon in #Brittany, France. From 1928 to 1934, archaeologists Marthe and Saint-Just Péquart discovered and excavated a range of Mesolithic habitats and a necropolis of the same period. During the #Mesolithic period, the sea level was much lower – it was possible to walk from #France to #England – and Téviec was situated in a lagoon. The hunter-gatherers of #Téviec buried their own dead in the middens. This helped to preserve the graves, as the carbonates from the shells in the middens insulated human bones from the acid soil.Many tools made of bone and antler were found along with numerous flint microliths. They were originally believed to date to 6575 years BP (± 350 years) but have now been dated to between 6740 and 5680 years BP. This indicates a longer occupation than previously thought, with its end coming at the beginning of the #Neolithic period.@atedge


79