Gena Bentall@seaottersavvy

Sea Otter Savvy is a collaborative outreach program promoting responsible sea otter stewardship. Sea otter biologist on duty. Respect the nap.

https://www.seaottersavvy.org/sea-otter-savvy-photography-workshop-gallery

Far away from the beautiful #centralcalifornia coast? Take a virtual tour of Moss Landing and Elkhorn Slough through the camera lenses of participants in our February Sea Otter Savvy Photography Workshop. Click the link in our profile to view the gallery including photos by @welcomebackotter, @ecoexposurephotography and more. Next workshop coming during Sea Otter Awareness Week in September!


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Be a witness to nature. #respectthenap #respectwildlife


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Adaptation: any change in structure or behavior of a species which helps it to become better fitted to survive in its environment. Here are skulls of a sea otter and its closest cousin, the river otter. What adaptations can you see for the movement from a more terrestrial to marine environment? These replica skulls are our newest props for our classroom visits! Want Sea Otter Savvy at your classroom? Click the link in our profile and fill out the request form. #adaptation #scienceteacher


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Be these guys. Respect the nap. #respectthenap


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I see you, tax procrastinators! Help me out by donating to the California Sea Otter Fund on line 410 of you CA Income Tax Form! You’ll be contributing to science, conservation and outreach all directed at helping me survive and flourish! It’s not too late! Thanks to @ki7iro_seaotter for sharing artwork for this cause!


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On this #CitSciDay and #marchforscience I thank all who share their time and passion for science and conservation. Our Sea Otter Savvy team has collected data that is increasing our understanding of how human recreation impacts sea otters. Some teams like Cheryl and Bob have been coming out weekly since the program began. Paws high for their dedication!


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#Repost from our Sea Otter Savvy photographer-in-residence @ecoexposurephotography with @get_repost
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Southern sea otters synchronized swimming on the surface of the sea?!? (say that 10 times fast) Intentional or not, this young Southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) pup is perfectly mimicking it's mother's grooming behavior. Survival is a dicey proposition for young sea otters, so these little pups must learn as much as they can from their mothers during their short 6 month dependency. Their lives literally depend on it. #momknowsbest #synchronizedswimming #copycat .
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#seaotter #seaotters #otters #ottersofinstagram #otterpup #respectthenap @seaottersavvy #elkhornslough #marinemammals #wildcalifornia #wildbayarea


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Countdown to #citizenscienceday! College students from @ucsantacruz , @calpolyslo, @csumb, and others participate in real field research and learn about data collection and science methods while collecting vital data about the effect of human disturbance on sea otters. #CitSciDay


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Team work for sea otters! Staff from @montereybaykayaks and @adventuresbythesea worked together on best practices for applying our #seaottersavvy decal to their rental fleet! Thanks for being ambassadors of Savvy, guys! #teamworkmakesthedreamwork


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DYK most of our research on the effects of human-caused disturbance to sea otters is conducted by volunteers? We are counting down to #citizenscienceday on April 14 by celebrating our dedicated team each day. Here is team member (and senior volunteer) Amy scanning until sunset at Elkhorn Slough.#CitSciDay


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#Repost @friendsseaotters with @get_repost
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Wondering what you can do to stop the proposal to increase sea otter harvesting (killing) in Southeast Alaska? Make your voice heard! Senate Joint Resolution 13 passed through the Alaska Senate and is on its way to the house. This concerning resolution would allow for sea otters to once again be killed in Southeast Alaska waters. It also calls for the federal government to transfer responsibility of sea otter management to the State of Alaska, meaning they could continue to increase sea otter take. With climate change and other natural threats, sea otters remain vulnerable across their range. In fact, one of the northern sea otter populations remains a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
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The Alaska sea otter population has definitely increased - no doubt about it - meaning local fisherman and Alaska Native populations have reasonable concerns about how to balance regional shellfish resources with the very hungry sea otters. But this Resolution is not the reasonable or balanced response needed! The Resolution states "BE IT RESOLVED that the Alaska State Legislature urges the United States.. to review current data and scientific evidence relating to sea otter abundance and the DETRIMENTAL EFFECTS of sea otters in Southeast Alaska and, after reviewing the evidence, waive the requirements of 16 U.S.C. 1371 to allow the taking of sea otters in Southeast Alaska.." Sea otters might be hungry and might eat lots of shellfish, but study after study proves that sea otters actually have a very beneficial effect on entire nearshore ecosystems, including the long-term health of shellfish and fish populations. ---
So what can you do? If you live in Alaska, contact your State Representative and urge them to vote no on the resolution! Don't live in Alaska? Contact your Senator and/or Congressman and urge them to ensure the Marine Mammal Protection Act and the ESA are not amended at the federal level. This dangerous resolution could set precedent for removal of critical protections for wildlife across the country.
#seaotters #ottersofinstagram #alaska #protectseaotters #saveourshores #protectwildlife #wildlife #


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While we are on the subject of sea otter teeth (see last post), DYK that scientists estimate the age of sea otters by looking at their teeth? A tooth has rings of cementum that are laid down annually and these can be counted like tree rings (photo on right). Field biologists can also score tooth condition to estimate whether an otter is a pup, sub-adult, or adult. Why do the teeth of sea otters wear so much as they age? See new research at https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70196202


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