Robbie Shone@shonephoto

@natgeo Photographer / Explorer / Innsbruck
Committed to creating unique images of exploration from our extreme subterranean world. @natgeocreative

www.shonephotography.com/

528 posts 255,247 followers 353 following

Robbie Shone

We’re in Hong Kong shooting stills and producing a 2 minute commercial vignette for the great new Honor 8X AI smartphone by Huawei. The camera within the phone features amazing low light capabilities and that’s what we’re here to test. Whilst traveling around Hong Kong, mostly at night, it’s great to see how well the camera performs in such dark and low light conditions. Stay tuned for more photographs from this smartphone. First photo of this set by our amazing fixer Marco (@marcomht). #smartphonephotography #NatGeo #Huawei #Huawei8XAI #smartphone #Huawei8X #FOX #huaweimobile


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Robbie Shone

Geologist Yuri Dublyansky collects samples of rare cryogenic cave calcites (CCC’s) from inside Rainbow Hall in Shulgan-Tash (Kapova) cave. These rare crystals formed when this part of the Ural Mountains, Russia, were in conditions of permafrost and the temperature in the cave was below 0’C. Uranium-thorium dating demonstrated that such conditions occurred in the Southern Ural Mountains some 37,000 years ago. The small nest of small CCCs sit in a drip-hole on the clay cave floor. Drips, falling from ca. 15m above made this hole and exposed the calcite. @uniinnsbruck #caveart #anciantart #cave #art #ShulganTash #Urals #UralMountains #Russia #science #research #climatechange


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Robbie Shone

Archaeologist Vladimir Shirokov and geologist Yuri Dublyansky examine the Western panel in the Hall of Drawings on the upper floor of Shulgan-Tash (Kapova) cave. From left to right the ancient artists have drawn a bison, a large mammoth with a baby mammoth following and another Red Mammoth. All the drawings on this panel neatly follow the shapes and relief of the cave wall. Based on this observation, archaeologists believe that the Red Mammoth was drawn at a different, more likely later time. @uniinnsbruck #caveart #anciantart #cave #art #ShulganTash #Urals #UralMountains #Russia #science #research #climatechange


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Robbie Shone

In full sunlight, the entrance portal of Shulgan-Tash (Kapova) cave can be spectacular. Here, geologist Yuri Dublyansky admires the Blue Lake, and the cathedral like shapes reflecting on the water. Cave divers have explored this lake to a depth of 88m below the surface. Shulgan-Tash (Kapova) cave lies in the Republic of Bashkortostan in the Ural Mountains, Russia and is home to a collection of very old cave art. @uniinnsbruck #caveart #anciantart #cave #art #ShulganTash #Urals #UralMountains #Russia #science #research #climatechange


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Robbie Shone

A portrait of geologist Yuri Dublyansky in Shulgan-Tash (Kapova) cave. Yuri posed for the photograph whilst wearing his strange looking spectacles that have a magnification of 2-x allowing a more precise collection of sampling in the field. Behind Yuri the polychrome composition “Horses and signs” can be seen on the southwest wall of Hall of Chaos in Shulgan-Tash (Kapova) cave. @uniinnsbruck #caveart #anciantart #cave #art #ShulganTash #Urals #UralMountains #Russia #science #research #climatechange


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Robbie Shone

Geologist Yuri Dublyansky and Rayan Achmedianov, from the Science-Research Center for Protection and Use of the Objects of Cultural Heritage of Republic of Bashkortostan (NPC), collect calcite samples that have formed on top of the ancient paintings. Back in the laboratory, Yuri uses a form of dating called uranium-thorium to establish an age for the calcite and thus the paintings.
This panel of artwork is called “Horse bas-relief” and is located on the Eastern wall in the Hall of Drawings of Shulgan-Tash (Kapova) cave, in the Republic of Bashkortostan, Ural Mountains, Russia. @uniinnsbruck #caveart #anciantart #cave #art #ShulganTash #Urals #UralMountains #Russia #science #research #climatechange


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Robbie Shone

The entrance to Ignatievskaya cave in the Republic of Bashkorostan, Ural Mountains, Russia, lies in a limestone cliff just a short way up from the banks of the Sim River.
Lighting their path with torches, geologist Yuri Dublyansky and two fellow researchers leave the cave after another day’s work sampling the calcite growing on top of the cave paintings. Analysing these samples should hopefully result in understanding when the art was originally created and what the climate was like at that time. @uniinnsbruck #caveart #anciantart #cave #art #ShulganTash #Urals #UralMountains #Russia #science #research #climatechange #Ignatievskaya


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Robbie Shone

Shulgan-Tash (Kapova) cave is located below the trees in the foreground and on the banks of this idyllic bend of the river Belaya (Agidel). It lies in the Bashkortostan region of the Ural Mountains that form the devide between Europe and Asia in Russia. The mountain Sarycuskan rises up behind in a forest of beautiful silver birch trees. Last autumn, we followed the work of geologist Yuri Dublyansky from the University of Innsbruck to one of his field sites to better understand how he dates the ancient cave paintings inside Shulgan-Tash. @uniinnsbruck #caveart #anciantart #cave #art #ShulganTash #Urals #UralMountains #Russia #science #research #climatechange


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Robbie Shone

Geologist Yuri Dublyansky near the polychrome composition “Horses and signs” on the southwest wall of Hall of Chaos in Shulgan-Tash (Kapova) cave, Russia. At the time of discovery of Paleolithic art in the cave by Alexander Riymin in 1959, the composition was completely coated with thick layer of grey flowstone, remnants of which are visible in the upper and left parts of the rock wall. In 1976, researchers from the archaeological expedition of Otto Bader have noticed on his wall a bright red spot from which a red paint was washing out. Restorers from this expedition removed opaque flowstone and exposed drawings. They only left millimeter-thick layer of translucent flowstone to protect drawings from adverse effects of water, flowing along the wall. The light-colored band shaped as upward-facing “wedge” partly obstructing the central part of the composition is the thin film of white calcite that precipitated from water films over the last 3-4 years. A series of red squares aligned vertically along the right side of this band are places where fresh calcite was removed by associates of NPS in 2017. The complex solution on restauration and conservation of this nicest but most vulnerable panel in the cave is now being developed. @uniinnsbruck #caveart #anciantart #cave #art #ShulganTash #Urals #UralMountains #Russia #science #research #climatechange


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Robbie Shone

We are currently away at the moment on an expedition to the deepest cave in the world in Abkhazia. We have just surfaced after spending two whole weeks underground exploring and photographing the lowest levels of the cave at -2212m. Following my return to civilisation I will share the stories from this amazing adventure. In the meantime I am super excited to share this belated news with you all about pioneering cave science in Greenland led by my fiancée Prof. Gina Moseley from the University of Innsbruck (@uniinnsbruck)
Repost @greenland_caves with @get_repost
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Thank you to the @bundeskanzleramt.gv.at, @sebastiankurz and the FWF for an inspiring evening discussing the future of research in Austria. It really is an honour for the @greenland_caves project to be recognized with a Start Award and to be amongst so many wonderful pioneering researchers.
#science #research #beopen #womeninstem #stem


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Robbie Shone

We met up with the Top To Top boat in Ittoqqortoormiit and because of the impending weather we immediately set sail for Iceland. We sailed directly east to begin with, to get beyond the ice in the East Greenland current as soon as possible, and then turned south. Whilst carrying out our watches, it gave us time to reflect on what we had seen and what might have been had the caves turned out to be caves. Nevermind. To close this story out, I would like to say a huge thanks to all of our sponsors, especially Gina Moseley and the Schwörer family (Top To Top) for making it happen. #EAGRE18 @greenland_caves


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Robbie Shone

As our time drew to an end on the Wagener Halvø peninsula, we often sat and looked out across this beautiful fjord at the iceberg. Occasionally we thought we could spot a seal or two sunning themselves on the ice. Because we were meeting back up with the boat, and the weather forecast suggested that we should head south sooner rather than later, we were not able to extend our stay much longer on the peninsula. We had planned to visit another potential cave site, but this would have needed a three-day fly camp, which we no longer had time for. We were, however, confident by now that this peninsula is unlikely to contain the sorts of caves that we were seeking. #EAGRE18 @greenland_caves


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