thephotosociety@thephotosociety

The Photo Society—a collective of over 170 National Geographic photographers. Sponsorship inquiries: thephotosocietyig@gmail.com

www.thephotosociety.org/

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thephotosociety

Photo by @amivitale for @rippleeffectimages. In the capital of #Dhaka, the impact of the great climate change migration is already being felt, with half a million migrants arriving in the city each year. In Bangladesh alone, there will be 20-35 million #refugees by 2050. The biggest reason they give for learning their homes and moving to the city is environmental degradation. Fields inundated with salt water are unable to produce food and sources of clean water become undrinkable, meaning villagers have to travel further and further for water. Unpredictable rains make fishing a deadly occupation. The sea is claiming the very lands their homes are built on. Luckily, @friendshipngo Floating Hospital offers an innovative solution to the crisis, bringing care along waterways directly to those who need it.
#globalwarming #flooding #climaterefugees #refugees #photojournalism #rain #children


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thephotosociety

Photo by Stephanie Sinclair @stephsinclairpix // A young woman dries her hair after bathing at the Rescue Foundation’s Mumbai home. Although illegal under Indian law, human trafficking remains a significant problem. According to @ApneAap, a nonprofit which works to end sex-trafficking by preventing inter-generational prostitution in India, there are currently 16 million victims of sex trafficking in the country. India’s Lok Sabha passed the Trafficking of Persons (Prevention, Protection and Rehabilitation) Bill earlier this year, criminalizing and penalizing trafficking for exploitative sex, forced and bonded labour, begging, surrogacy and forced marriages. However, UN human rights experts say is must be revised with victim-centerd approach rather than criminalizing survivors, potentially further harming already vulnerable individuals. @canonusa #women #girls #trafficking #survivor #beauty #color #hope #change #expoloreroflight #canoncps


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thephotosociety

Photo by @rezaphotography

Candyfloss
#Turkey, #Istanbul. On the Galata Bridge.
I spent few months in Turkey through years while on different assignments for National Geographic Magazine. I like the city of Istanbul, between West and East. At one point, years ago, I even thought that I will move there. This particular day, while observing the patience of the fishermen waiting for the fish, those three candyfloss sellers came to me.
A strange contrast with Suleymaniye and Yeni Mosques in the background.
Text by Rachel Deghati. Published in the book Reporters Without Borders ( 2008). #galatabridge #bridge #fishermen #fish #candyfloss #patience #turkish #mosque #Suleymaniye #yeni #pink #photooftheday #photojournalism #reza #rezaphoto #rezadeghati #rezaphotography #rezaphotojournalist #webistan #رضادقتى# عكاس @thephotosociety


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thephotosociety

Photo by @pedromcbride // Piercing the turquoise mirror of Antarctica’s changing, melting world of Graham Land where temperatures are heating up and changing the landscape and ecosystem the evolved among them. To see more wild places, follow @pedromcbride. #reflection #nature #adventure #blue #changingclimate #kayak


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Photo by @randyolson // Siena doesn’t have back alleys... just little tunnels through history. With @melissafarlow and @federicaarmstrong #sienaphotoworkshop #sienaphotoawards #sienaitaly @sipacontest @thephotosociety @natgeoimagecollection


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thephotosociety

Photo by @shonephoto (Robbie Shone) // After setting up base camp we went for a walk to check out our new surroundings. Gina brought along some vials so that she could collect samples of water, ice and snow for chemical analysis. Here she is collecting samples from a snow bank where she can easily access different depths within the snow. #EAGRE18 @greenland_caves


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thephotosociety

Photograph by @andyparkinsonphoto/@thephotosociety
Northern gannet pair – Gannets are such mesmerizingly beautiful birds, filled with intricate detail, smooth sleek lines and moments of occasional tenderness. This is an image that I have just ‘found’, not because I never knew that it existed but because, like so much of my earlier digital work it hadn’t so much been processed as bludgeoned into submission. It was too dark, too yellow, the processing was at best ham-fisted and whilst this sensitive image was always there I had never ‘seen’ it. One of the blessings of working for the last few weeks on my website is that entire species files are being opened and looked through, probably for the first time in years. My gannet files, because of the work that I did with them over many years are pretty sizeable and whilst the processing on a lot of my recent images is at least passable some of my earlier ones, such as this, were appallingly treated and as such have always been completely overlooked. This image was captured on a sunny day but as a small cloud passed overhead the gannets were spared from frustrating shadows whilst the blue sky behind at least offered some colour, albeit cyan. What I love about this image is the simplicity of its feel, it looks and feels tender and gentle, a feeling that for anyone who has ever worked with gannets knows is not a character trait that is witnessed too often. The two exquisitely marked birds pausing for a moment, the male behind looking engagingly down at the seated female. My eye is also drawn to the slightly abstract nature of the males’ pose, his bill framed by his sweeping neck and the relatively subtle, pastel tones also contribute to its gentle, serene feel. Please follow me at @andyparkinsonphoto for more photo tips @andyparkinsonphoto@thephotosociety


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Please read the caption, thanks to all those who engaged with this issue ❤️💚👍🏿👍🏼 - Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - a black rhino killed in the north of Liwonde National Park, Malawi, the poacher sliced off its face, is held by a ranger from African Parks @africanparksnetwork - BEIJING (REUTERS) - China has postponed the lifting of a ban on the trade of rhino horn and tiger parts for medicine and other uses, the government said today, Monday (Nov 12), after a storm of protest from conservation groups over a plan to water down the decades-old prohibition. In October, the State Council issued a circular replacing a 1993 ban on the trade of tiger bones and rhinoceros horn, opening up exceptions under “special circumstances”, including medical “research” - lifting of the ban would have been disastrous for endangered rhino and tiger populations globally, which are already under critical pressure from a black market supplying the traditional medicine trade; even if the animal parts were only sourced from those bred in captivity, it would most certainly have resulted in increased poaching of wild populations pushing them closer to extinction. China banned trade in tiger bones and rhino horns 25 years ago as part of global efforts to save the animals, that ban is now back in place. Thank you to all those brave men and women who put their lives on the line to protect the planets wildlife. I hope by reversing this decision China will as a result be saving many many lives across all species, including our own. Please share and spread at least a little good news 💚💚 @africanparksnetwork @thephotosociety @everydayextinction @natgeo #notrade #noextinction


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Photo by @lucianocandisani ( Luciano Candisani ). A Baobab from my last month assignment in Madagascar for @onelapsebr.
@lucianocandisani #baobab#photography #fotografia #fotografiabrasileira #photography #madagascar @natgeo


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Photo by @MichaelGeorge // Baby manatees José, Dex, & Ursula were rescued in September 2017 after Hurricane Irma separated them from their parents. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission brought them to the SeaWorld Rescue Team at @seaworldorlando for rehabilitation and release. These babies require constant care, and are bottle-fed every 3 hours, 24/7. Their bottles are filled with an infant formula with plant oils, protein sources, coconut oil, macadamia nut oil, and sustainably harvested palm oil. The SeaWorld Rescue Team has come to the aid of 31,000 ill, injured, and orphaned animals In need over the past few decades. In addition to these babies, the team recently received a call about a small group of adult manatees in South Carolina who were caught in a sudden cold spell. They were days away from dying of frostbite and the rescue team drove back and forth for 3 days, working 24 hours, to bring the adults to their Manatee Hospital.
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A few quick fun facts about these adorable seacows: 1) You might be surprised to learn that the manatee’s closest relative is the elephant. 2) They are one of the only mammals that doesn’t have eyelashes. 3) Their eyes actually close in a circle like the aperture of a camera.
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Many of the zoos in Florida have extensive conservation and rescue programs due to the many endangered species in the state. Manatee hospitals have managed to stabilize the population, and as of January 7, 2016, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that the West Indian manatee is proposed to be downlisted from endangered to threatened status under the Endangered Species Act.
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To learn more about these programs you can pre-order my upcoming children’s book ‘Life at the Zoo’ by visiting my website ( www.michaelgeorgephoto.com )! I created this book to shed light on the many misconceptions about zoos and to teach children (and adults) the role they play in breeding, conservation, and rescue programs. Also, I just love baby manatees. // #babymanatee #manatee #animalrescue


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Photo by @davidalanharvey | Double exposure. Two lenses. 105/35. Kodachrome. Somewhere in Malaysia a long time ago.. #malaysia


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Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - Golden eagle chick, Cairngorm National Park, Scotland - these guys are incredibly important to the ecosystem and yet many in the highlands see them as pests as they take large numbers of grouse, rabbit, hare, and young deer given the opportunity. We climbed down to this nest towards the end of July accompanying the licensed ringer who weighed, measured and ringed both the chicks in this nest; and yes he is very much watching me, I was after all pretty much sharing his nest 😏💚❤️ Both have now fledged and will compliment the biodiversity of this region. It’s vital that estates here support these populations - to see more from here and elsewhere, follow me @chancellodavid @thephotosociety @everydayextinction


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