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On #BigLittleLies, @nicolekidman plays Celeste, a woman who is struggling to leave her abusive husband. As @naomiwatts writes about Kidman, one of TIME’s 100 most influential people in the world, “she fills her character with so much humanity, it is beyond unnerving. Her emotions. Her fragility. Her ferocity. Her subtlety. Her physicality. Her bravery.” Kidman grew up with a mother who took her to the Women’s Electoral Lobby, a group in Australia that works to improve the position of women in society. "I was a kid, I was really little, but I gleaned things even then and there was a huge room of women that were making changes. I remember it—and so much of it is about passing it on,” she tells TIME. "So much of what we’ve built comes from our friendships. The stories that we’re telling and the way in which we’re doing it creates opportunities for not only our generation but the generations to come.” See the full #TIME100 list at TIME.com/100. Video by @spencerbakalar and @dianetsai_ for TIME


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@rogerfederer, as @thisisbillgates puts it, is the “greatest tennis player ever.” At age 36, Federer has 20 Grand Slam titles. But all those successes came with lessons along the way. "Sometimes you get unlucky. Sometimes your opponent’s better. Sometime’s it’s just not your day. You can’t win them all but at the same time, you can give all you have,” says Federer, one of TIME’s 100 most influential people in the world. "In the beginning of my career it was almost painful. You get disappointed, frustrated, play a terrible match… today I can analyze it much better in the very moment and I think, this is what experience is all about.” See the full #TIME100 list at TIME.com/100. Video by @spencerbakalar and @dianetsai_ for TIME


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@tiffanyhaddish, whose gregarious exuberance and recent ascent to fame has made her a joy on the talk-show circuit, recently shared a couple @beyonce anecdotes with the kind of candor that's usually not seen by those who want to remain close to #Beyonce. But this is a decision that Haddish—one of TIME's 100 most influential people in the world—seems to believe merited a gentle warning from Beyoncé in the @djkhaled song "Top Off" with the line: "if they’re tryna party with the queen, they gon’ have to sign a nondisclosure." It’s totally possible that Beyoncé was being general, but here's what Haddish tells TIME: "I made it! I finally made it!” She continued: "It’s not all the NAACP awards, or people saying I’m the 'breakout star of the year,' or even being in this magazine—none of that counts. Beyoncé don’t put people names in her songs. But she said *my* name. I made it." See the full #TIME100 list at TIME.com/100. Video by @arpane, @spencerbakalar and @juliamarielull for TIME


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This year’s #TIME100 honorees have found financial success by fronting blockbusters, winning Grand Slam titles and painting presidential portraits—but they still remember the thrill of receiving their first big paychecks. Fashion designer @csiriano opted to splurge on "fabulous furniture that I should not have bought … and maybe a really chic bag." Girls Trip standout @tiffanyhaddish used her first big check to open up a checking account and treat herself to a box of @snickers. For @jlo, who told TIME she grew up in the Bronx "and had holes in my shoes," each time she made money, "it was big to me." Hear from @nicolekidman, @kehindewiley and more, then check out the full list of the 100 most influential people in the world at TIME.com/100. Video by @spencerbakalar, @juliamarielull and @dianetsai_ for TIME


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@jlo is one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2018—and one of our six #TIME100 covers. "As a kid growing up in the Bronx," writes Emmy-nominated actor @kerrywashington, "I used to watch Jennifer Lopez from the wings. Several of us girls would hide in the folds of the curtains at the Boys & Girls Club to watch her perform. We were in awe of our neighborhood role model and phenom. When Jennifer left the Bronx to pursue her dreams, I would rush to finish my homework on Sunday to watch her on In Living Color. She made me believe that you could come from where we came from and achieve whatever you imagine is possible." Lopez became the first Latina actor to earn over $1 million for a film and the first woman to have a No. 1 album and a No. 1 movie in the same week. Adds Washington: "But she’s also a mother, an entrepreneur, an activist, a designer, a beauty icon, a philanthropist and a producer. She is an undeniable force and a powerful example—not just for women of color but for anyone who has been made to feel 'other' and for everyone who carries the burden and the privilege of being a first." See the full list at TIME.com/100. Photograph by Peter Hapak for TIME


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Satya Nadella is one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2018—and one of our six #TIME100 covers. Since becoming CEO of @microsoft in 2014, writes Walter Isaacson, a professor of history at Tulane University and a former managing editor of TIME, has restored the company’s spirit of innovation. Consider its new product strategy, which emphasizes cloud computing and allowing people to collaborate across platforms. Nadella also preaches the importance of empathy and making products that work reliably. The result is that in the four years since he inherited a sticky wicket, Microsoft’s market value has increased 130%. More important, the company is now making products that feel more user-friendly, empathetic and collaborative. See the full list at TIME.com/100. Photograph by Peter Hapak for TIME


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@taranajaneen is one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2018—and one of our six #TIME100 covers. When @gabunion first met Tarana Burke, who founded the #metoo movement in 2006, she found "a kindred spirit, somebody else who’s been screaming into the hurricane. Somebody else who’s been advocating for survivors of rape and sexual assault, and specifically young black women, whose voices have been silenced at best and completely erased from the national dialogue at worst." Adds Union, "When you’ve been sidelined for so long, it’s exhilarating to know that such a powerful voice is finally breaking through. Tarana will continue to do this work, but the stage will be bigger and the microphone turned all the way up. She will inspire legislation and new crops of voters. She will sway old voters. She will open eyes. She’s not even going to bring more seats to the table—she’s going to turn the table over and build a new one." See the full list at TIME.com/100. Photograph by Peter Hapak for TIME


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@rogerfederer is one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2018—and one of our six #TIME100 covers. "It’s no secret that Roger Federer is the greatest tennis player ever," writes @thisisbillgates, a co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. "But not as many fans know about what Roger is doing off the court." Twice, Gates writes, "I’ve had the thrill of being his doubles partner to help raise money for his foundation, and we’ve become friends in the process. I’ve learned how sincerely Roger and his team are working to improve the life prospects for poor children—a mission that stems from his childhood visits to his mother’s home country of South Africa and seeing extreme poverty firsthand." He adds: "Roger knows that effective philanthropy, like great tennis, requires discipline and time. It will be a sad day for all of us fans when he hangs up his racket—but we can take comfort in knowing that he’s committed to making the world a more equitable place." See the full list at TIME.com/100. Photograph by Peter Hapak for TIME


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@nicolekidman is one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2018—and one of our six #TIME100 covers. "Dead Calm was released in 1989. Big Little Lies was released in 2017. In the interim, Kidman has never once left our consciousness," writes @naomiwatts, the Oscar-nominated actor. "And even after decades, she continues to break new ground." Beyond being an outstanding actor, adds Watts, "Nicole has intelligence, compassion, kindness and humor that make her the epitome of a great woman and friend. There is no question that I and audiences the world over will continue to value and admire her for decades to come." See the full list at TIME.com/100. Photograph by Peter Hapak for TIME


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@tiffanyhaddish is one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2018—and one of our six #TIME100 covers. @kevinhart4real met her on the #comedy scene 13 years ago: "She was young, raw and funny, almost like she didn’t have a care in the world. But when I noticed her car was packed to the brim with her belongings," recalls the actor, who stars alongside Haddish in @nightschool (out Sept. 28), "I asked her if everything was O.K. That’s when I found out she was homeless and living in that car." Hart gave her $300—"it was all I had with me"—and handed it to her. "Now Tiffany is bringing a whole new level of fresh to the comedy scene. She’s just so authentic and unfiltered," he adds. "You never know what’s going to come out of her mouth. And you can tell she’s having fun—she’s seen a time when things couldn’t get any worse, and she’s giving it all she has." See the full list at TIME.com/100. Photograph by Peter Hapak for TIME


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A young girl is helped by members of the NGO SOS Mediterranee from the Aquarius vessel during an operation to rescue #migrants, about 50 kilometers off the Libyan coast in the #Mediterranean on April 18. Approximatly 100 people, mostly from western Africa, were rescued. United Nations migration officials have tallied more than 18,000 sea arrivals to Europe so far this year. Photograph by Christophe Petit Tesson—EPA-EFE/@shutterstock


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Barbara Bush, the beloved wife of the 41st President and mother of the 43rd President, died at 92 on April 17. Her death was confirmed by the office of her husband, former President George H. W. Bush. The family matriarch, she had dropped out of college to follow her childhood sweetheart—and kept following as he went from the House of Representatives to the United Nations, the CIA, Vice Presidency and, finally, the White House. One son became President. Another, the governor of Florida. Her husband's statement noted she was survived by 17 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Bush, photographed here with Millie on the White House lawn in 1989, championed causes from homelessness to AIDS, but was most known as an advocate for literacy. As a political figure, she was a widely respected and fierce woman—appreciated for her biting wit, unwavering support of family and frank disposition. As TIME noted in a 1989 profile, the First Lady’s relaxed nature was a welcomed departure from the glitz of her predecessor, Nancy Reagan. She owned all of the characteristics that could have been written off as weaknesses: her snow-white hair, the $90 string of faux pearls she wore to hide her wrinkles, her size 14 frame. "I think women like me because they don’t think I’m competitive, just nice," she said once. That sense of humor came in handy on the campaign trail, and her influence over her husband was noticeable. "During Bush’s post-election vacation, he was asked whether he had received any advice about his new job," TIME reported in 1989. "He smiled broadly and pointed to his wife, standing nearby in tennis shoes and sweats. Barbara raised her eyebrows and said, 'Just kidding.' Replied Bush: 'No, she’s not.'" Read more about the life of Barbara Bush on TIME.com. Photograph by Diana Walker—The @LIFE Images Collection/@gettyimages


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