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On Monday night, late-night comedians had plenty to say about Omarosa Manigault Newman and her new book, “Unhinged”. From Omarosa alleging that she saw Trump eat a piece of paper in the Oval Office, to the recording of the conversation between Trump and Omarosa after she was fired, Stephen Colbert, Jimmy Kimmel, Trevor Noah, and others all joined in on the mocking.


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This is Justice, an 8-year-old American quarter horse who used to be named Shadow. When he was named Shadow, he suffered. According to court filings, Justice’s former owner surrendered the horse to a rescue organization in March 2017 at the urging of a neighbor in Cornelius, west of Portland. In a letter to law enforcement, a veterinarian who examined the horse at the time said he was “severely emaciated,” lethargic and weak. That poor condition probably contributed to a lasting problem — the animal’s genitals had prolapsed, which eventually led to frostbite, trauma and infection. The horse is now suing his former owner, seeking at least $100,000 for veterinary care, as well as damages “for pain and suffering,” to fund a trust that would stay with him no matter who is his caretaker. Read more of his story on washingtonpost.com. (Photo by @vanhoutenphoto/The Washington Post)


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Justice, a horse who was neglected and left with lasting injuries, stands in the pasture at his foster home, which is owned by Betsy Oaks, in Estacada, Oregon. Justice, who was rescued by Sound Equine Options, is suing his previous owner for compensation in the first-ever lawsuit in which a horse is named a plaintiff. An Oregon Supreme Court case ruling determined that animals can be individual crime victims, so animal rights lawyers filed on Justice's behalf. While in his foster home, he is sharing a pasture with three other rescued horses: Lincoln, Badger and Flick. They are all geldings. Both Justice and Lincoln, another rescue, were not gelded until recently and were not properly socialized, so they are in a barn and pasture with other geldings who can help them learn how to socialize without the distraction of mares and stallions. Read more on washingtonpost.com.(Photos by @vanhoutenphoto/The Washington Post)


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At a veterinarian’s exam last year, Justice the horse was 300 pounds underweight, his black coat lice-ridden, his skin scabbed and his genitals so frostbitten that they might still require amputation. The horse was left outside and underfed by his previous owner, who last summer pleaded guilty to criminal neglect. And now Justice, who today resides with other rescued equines on a quiet wooded farm within view of Oregon’s Cascade mountains, is suing his former owner for negligence. In a lawsuit filed in his new name in a county court, the horse seeks at least $100,000 for veterinary care, as well as damages “for pain and suffering,” to fund a trust that would stay with him forever. Read more of his story on washingtonpost.com. (Photos by @vanhoutenphoto/The Washington Post)


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Kellyanne Conway, counselor to the president, on Sunday sent the Internet scrambling after she trotted out the mononymous “Ja’Ron” when asked to name the most prominent African American person serving in the West Wing. There is a White House policy adviser by that name, but he hardly occupies one of the most high-ranking, public-facing roles. And his office is not in the West Wing. The stumble newly highlighted an uncomfortable truth for a White House that has projected an overwhelmingly white image of itself, from Oval Office action shots, which pull back the curtain on the coterie of people with their hands on the levers of power, to photos of the intern class, which reveal the crop of young people on whom the Trump administration bestows opportunity each season.


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A pedestrian with an umbrella walks down steps at the Thomas Jefferson Memorial on Monday in Washington. (Photo by @mattmcclainphoto/The Washington Post)


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Freddie Cox carries a flag to plant at the charred remnants of his godfather, Ed Bledsoe's home, Sunday in Redding, Calif. Bledsoe's wife, Melody, great-grandson James Roberts and great-granddaughter Emily Roberts were killed at the home in the Carr Fire. The fire, which began July 23, has burned 202,976 acres and is 61 percent contained. More than 1,000 residences have been destroyed. (Photo by John Locher/AP Photo)


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President Trump salutes a U.S. Army soldier as he observes a military demonstration with U.S. Army Major General Walter “Walt” Piatt, the Commanding General of the Army's 10th Mountain Division at Fort Drum, New York on Monday. As soldiers looked on, Trump signed a sprawling $716 billion defense bill named for John McCain, the ailing senator who has been among the president’s harshest Republican critics. The bill setting policy priorities for the Pentagon for the coming year is formally named the “John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act For Fiscal Year 2019.” The overwhelmingly bipartisan spending plan, approved by the Senate in June on an 85-to-10 vote, represents an $82 billion increase over the current year. (Photo by Carlos Barria/Reuters)


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Once, Kyle Laman had been excited for his school's Military Ball, a springtime event to honor the students in the junior ROTC program. He and his friends were going to rent a limo. They were going to dance all night. But now the 15-year-old can’t dance, thanks to a heavy medical boot that encases his foot and calf. Some other students are skipped the event entirely, still too traumatized to handle large crowds. And three of Kyle’s JROTC classmates who should be at the ball are dead. They were among the 17 people killed when a gunman attacked the freshman building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Feb. 14. Kyle, who came face-to-face with the shooter in a third-floor hallway strewn with bodies, escaped with a bullet wound to his foot. Doctors told his parents it would be a year before he could walk normally again. He and his parents, still learning to navigate the universal trials of adolescence, now also face the lingering horror of a mass shooting. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @mattmcclainphoto/The Washington Post)


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Last fall, Kyle Laman and his family had moved to their leafy Coral Springs neighborhood expressly so he could attend Stoneman Douglas High — the best school in the county, in the safest city in the state. Months later, with a single bullet, their normal was shattered. Kyle, 15, came face-to-face with the Parkland shooter in a hallway strewn with bodies, and escaped with a bullet wound to his foot. The bullet severed the major vessels that carry blood to the foot, as well as his tibialis anterior tendon, which contracts to lift the foot off the ground. In an eight-hour procedure five days after the shooting, surgeon Michael Cheung repaired the tendon and covered the wound with a flap of tissue taken from his left thigh. Painstakingly, they attached blood vessels in the transplanted tissue to the fragmented structures in his foot, restoring blood flow to the limb. Then they installed an external fixator to hold his ankle in place while the tendon healed. Doctors told his parents it would be a year before he could walk normally again, but no one can say how long it will take his mental scars to heal. Read more by clicking the link in our bio.(Photo by @mattmcclainphoto/The Washington Post)


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Kyle Laman, 15, came face-to-face with the Parkland shooter in February in a third-floor hallway strewn with bodies, and escaped with a bullet wound to his foot. Doctors told his parents it would be a year before he could walk normally again. No one can say how long it will take his mental scars to heal. The teenager has days when he doesn’t want to leave the house and can’t focus at school. Sometimes his frustration flares in an angry outburst; sometimes he just wants to hole up in his room and play video games alone. His parents aren’t sure how much is standard 15-year-old behavior and what is the vestige of trauma. They don’t know how to help or whether he can be helped at all. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @mattmcclainphoto/The Washington Post)


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A meteor streaks through the night sky during the Perseid meteor shower over the lake of Kozjak, near Skopje, Republic of Macedonia, on Monday. The Perseid meteor shower is known for being beautiful and scientifically stunning. Debris left behind from the long-gone Swift-Tuttle comet burns up in the atmosphere when the Earth runs into it and the result is a spectacular outburst of colorful light streaking across the sky. At its peak, roughly 75 shooting stars pass overhead every hour. (Photo by Georgi Licovski/Epa-Efe/Rex/Shutterstock)


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