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The Washington Post

Redskins quarterback Alex Smith will miss the rest of the season after suffering a broken tibia and fibula in his right leg during the team’s loss to Houston on Sunday. Smith was carted off the field midway through the third quarter after he was sacked by Texans defensive back Kareem Jackson. It was immediately clear that the injury was serious, as his lower leg and ankle appeared to be bending in the wrong direction. The injury quickly drew comparisons to the nasty broken leg that Redskins quarterback Joe Theismann suffered in 1985. Theismann actually tweeted, “Alex’s leg is exactly like mine 33 yrs ago.” Theismann’s injury also took place on Nov. 18. (Photo by @newtonja/The Washington Post)


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The Washington Post

Via @coveringpotus: President Trump Saturday said he would help Californians solve their forest fire problem. He promised federal funds and said it's important to "rake" the forest floors. “You’ve got to take care of the floors. You know the floors of the forests, it’s very important,” Trump said. He explained that the president of Finland told him about raking the floors. “They spent a lot of time on raking and cleaning and doing things, and they don’t have any problem," Trump said. The Finnish president later said that he had briefed Trump on their efforts to care for forests, but couldn't recall them talking about raking. Wherever Trump got the notion that raking could have prevented the Camp Fire, forest experts seem to disagree. Raking is an effective way to clear light debris like leaves away from residences, they say. But it’s of much less use on the forest floor, where infernos burn through swaths of brush that only heavy machinery can clear. California’s problems are solvable — but through long-term programs of community education, controlled burns, forest-thinning programs and economic incentives, according to experts. It's not as simple as raking the forests to prevent wildfires. (Photo by Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)


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The Washington Post

Democrat Sen. Bill Nelson, who was first elected in 2000, has conceded to Republican Rick Scott after a recount in the Florida Senate race. State officials concluded a hand recount Sunday that showed Scott leading Nelson by just over 10,000 votes out of more than 8 million cast. Shortly thereafter, Nelson called Scott to concede. Scott, Florida’s governor, has been ahead in the vote count since the Nov. 6 election. The victory increases Republicans’ Senate majority to 52 seats, with a final race, in Mississippi, to be decided Nov. 27. (Photo by J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo)


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The Washington Post

Exactly one year and eight minutes after two U.S. Park Police officers shot Bijan Ghaisar, 25, as he sat, unarmed, behind the wheel of his Jeep, his family and hundreds of supporters gathered Saturday night at the foot of the Reflecting Pool to honor his memory. The Park Police, and the FBI as the investigating agency, have been resolute in their silence about the slaying on Nov. 17, 2017, refusing to name the two officers involved, explain why they shot an unarmed man or decide whether they should face any charges. The large crowd Saturday chanted throughout the protest: "We want names. We want justice. We are Bijan." Read more on washingtonpost.com. (Photo by @mswontheroad/The Washington Post)


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The Washington Post

40 years ago, Charles Krause, a Washington Post foreign correspondent at the time, went to South America along with California congressman Leo J. Ryan and his entourage to visit a remote cult compound known as Jonestown. After hearing reports from concerned family members — who claimed that temple members were held there against their will, assaulted and abused — the congressman decided to fly down to investigate, accompanied by several members of the press. But Jim Jones, the Cult's leader, had no intention of allowing the visitors to leave and dispatched several of his armed followers on a flatbed truck to stop Ryan’s plane. They assassinated Ryan and murdered four others at the airfield. Krause was shot in the hip during the attack, laying on the tarmac of the remote jungle airstrip, holding still and pretending to be dead. Despite his own injury, Krause kept reporting on Jonestown in the days after, filing detailed reports as the first journalist allowed to return to the gruesome site. Krause, now 71, recently sat down with The Post for an interview ahead of the 40-year anniversary. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @king_marvino/The Washington Post)


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The Washington Post

While congressional leadership fights have historically revolved around insular matters such as committee assignments and rules changes, the battle over who will lead the newly won majority for Democrats in the House has exploded into a national political campaign. At stake is not merely the House speakership, a job second in line to the presidency, but who will emerge as the country’s most high-profile counterpoint to President Trump — who will set the strategy for investigating him, who will lead the opposition to his agenda, and who will be the face of the Democratic Party ahead of the 2020 campaign. The country’s biggest unions, arguing that Rep. Nancy Pelosi is the best equipped to take on Trump, have lobbied Democrats to back her. Top donors have placed calls to lean on undecided members. Celebrities have weighed in as well, and prominent liberal activists have openly discussed fomenting primary challenges in the next campaign against the leaders of the anti-Pelosi opposition. Read more about how the fight for the speakership has exploded into a national political campaign at washingtonpost.com. (Photo by @melinamara/ The Washington Post)


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The Washington Post

Democrat Andrew Gillum has officially conceded to Trump ally Ron DeSantis in Florida's race for governor. DeSantis, a former member of Congress, edged out the Tallahassee Mayor, who would have become Florida's first black governor. Gillum had conceded the race on election night, but as the vote counts became tight, he rescinded his concession and had been calling for counting to continue. "I wanted to take a moment to congratulate Mr. DeSantis on becoming the governor of the great state of Florida," Gillum said with his wife standing by him in a Facebook video. "I tell you this has been the journey of our lives." (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)


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The Washington Post

Congresswoman-elect Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, who along with Michigan Democrat Rashida Tlaib will become the first Muslim women to ever serve in Congress, wears a headscarf — something that could fall afoul of the 181-year-old House rule banning members from wearing any kind of hat on the floor. Democrats are proposing changing the rule to allow all religious headwear into the House chamber. The proposal was included as part of a slate of rule changes that Democrats will seek to implement once they assume control of the House next year. The proposed change, which they say is to promote diversity and ensure that the freedom of religious expression is protected on Capitol Hill, effectively doubles as a rebuke of the anti-Muslim rhetoric voiced by Republican candidates in several 2018 midterm races. It also is notable for coming at a time when several U.S. allies in Europe are adopting countrywide bans on face veils. (Photo by Erik S Lesser/EPA-EFE/REX)


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The Washington Post

Via @coveringpotus: At the White House on Saturday, President Trump said that he would speak with the CIA about its finding that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the assassination of journalist and Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi. The Post first reported Friday that the CIA had assessed with high confidence that the crown prince ordered the killing, based on multiple sources of intelligence. “We haven’t been briefed yet. The CIA will be speaking to me today,” Trump told reporters before leaving to survey damage from wildfires in California. But the president has already been shown evidence of the prince’s alleged involvement in the killing, and privately he remains skeptical, Trump aides told The Post. He has also looked for ways to avoid pinning the blame on Mohammed, the aides said. Trump's most recent comments put him at odds with the findings of the CIA and senior intelligence officials. (Photo by Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA-EFE/REX)


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The Washington Post

Angel, a 13-year-old migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America trying to reach the U.S., looks towards the United States past the border fence in Tijuana, Mexico. After more than a month and some 3,000 miles, the caravan has reached the end of its road. What had been a plodding slog through southern Mexico rapidly accelerated in the past week, as many migrants rode in buses, provided by local governments, along the route from Mexico City north to the border. More than 2,000 people have arrived in Tijuana this week, with another 7,000 not far behind, according to Mexican authorities. That doesn’t include the roughly 3,000 migrants who were already in Tijuana seeking legal entry into the United States. For many in the caravan, the next step is to apply for asylum at the San Ysidro border crossing, and what that means is waiting. (Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters)


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The Washington Post

The Camp Fire, which is now the most destructive in California’s history, swept through 11,000 homes and buildings in Paradise and adjoining mountaintop communities on Nov. 8. leaving at least 71 dead. As firefighters battle to contain the deadly fire, authorities have intensified efforts to identify the lost and the dead. Teams of volunteers in white protective gear searched blackened ground and family members went to makeshift DNA centers where their mouths were swabbed to help identify victim remains. The remains of at least 13 victims have not been identified, officials say. The list of people unaccounted for exceeded 1,000 on Friday, after authorities released more than 600 names in an effort to identify those who had been found by friends and relatives. The astonishing tally raised fears that the death toll would rise exponentially. (Photos by Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post)


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The Washington Post

People attend a symbolic funeral prayer for Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi at the courtyard of Fatih mosque in Istanbul, on Friday. The Post reported Friday evening that the CIA has concluded that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered Khashoggi's assassination, citing people familiar with the matter. The assessment is the most definitive to date linking the crown prince to the operation, in which a team of 15 Saudi agents flew to Istanbul on government aircraft and killed Khashoggi inside the Saudi Consulate last month. The CIA’s conclusion about Mohammed’s role was based on multiple sources of intelligence as well as the agency’s assessment of the prince as the country’s de facto ruler who oversees even minor affairs in the kingdom. (Photo by Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images)


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