Witness Change@witness_change

Our visual storytelling on human rights abuses aims to change opinions. Visit our latest campaigns @whereloveisillegal @onedayinmyworld

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Witness Change

“I don’t want to write because I don’t want to remember.” Milli is a lesbian from South Africa and a survivor of 'corrective rape'. Her attacker was eventually caught, but only after the police were pressured by Free Gender, a black South African lesbian organization fighting to end #homophobia. Mili does not like discussing that day.
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Click the link in our profile to see how to share your own experience of #survival and #discrimination and learn how you can support. Photo by @Hammond_Robin. This is a @witness_change project. For more stories of survival follow @WhereLoveIsIllegal #loveislove


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Witness Change

New work from @onedayinmyworld (link in our profile)! Families in South Africa trusted care homes with their relatives lives. The care stopped and dozens died.
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It has become known as Democratic South Africa’s worst human rights scandal. In an attempt to save money, 1,700 people with mental illness and intellectual disability were moved from the specialised care facility Life Esidimeni into unlicensed care homes. Within two years, 144 people - nearly one in 10 - died. Causes of death included starvation, dehydration, and cold. Relatives were awarded damages, but for this most horrendous case of mass neglect, no one has faced criminal charges. Money is not enough. The relatives want justice.
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#inmyworld is designed to expose the challenges faced by people living with #mentalhealth issues and give them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to improve life for excluded groups by amplifying their stories. To see more or to share your own mental health story please follow @onedayinmyworld #humanrights #StandUp4HumanRights


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Witness Change

"We just want to be understood and free express our love publicly.” Seth & Andrews are a gay couple from Ghana. They’ve been together for one year, but they can’t let their family or community learn of their relationship without the risk of losing everything. “We want to express ourself in public and freely, but the society don't accept that act.”
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Where Love is Illegal traveled to Kenya, Mozambique and Ghana with the support of Elton John AIDS Foundation (@ejaf) to continue our work sharing LGBTQI+ stories of survival and to raise awareness of the impacts of stigma. Around the world, grants made by the Elton John AIDS Foundation make possible the work of countless community-rooted organizations that touch the lives of millions every day. For more information, and to join the fight, visit www.ejaf.org
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Click the link in our profile to see how to share your own experience of #survival and #discrimination and learn how you can support. Photo by @Hammond_Robin. This is a @witness_change project. For more stories of survival follow @WhereLoveIsIllegal #loveislove


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Witness Change

“I saw the neighborhood on fire. I saw my son shot in the neck and die. I had to bury him there," recalls 60 year-old Rohingya refugee Dilbahar. "I lost my daughter's husband. I lost my other son. I don’t know if they are alive or not… the Mogh [local Rakhine Buddhists] chopped off the head of my sister and my sister's daughter… I saw their bodies.” Dilbhar’s husband survived the attack but was left disabled after being beaten by the military. About life in the camp, she says: “Though it is not peaceful we try to find peace here. As we lost our country, because we were being hit and injured and we o have a country to call our own. But we try to find peace here.” The memory of the violence haunts Dilbahar “I cant bear the pain inside when i think of those things that happened.” She has turned to God for comfort: “Whenever I feel that pain I pray and ask for help... Whenever I pray and ask for help from the Almighty I feel peace… I try to convince my heart that although my sons are not here, they are dead, I pray that we might be able to go back there peacefully.”
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Last August, “ethnic cleansing” perpetrated by the Myanmar military against the Rohingya sparked a massive refugee crisis. Nearly a million Rohingya – those who escaped the flames and executions – are now living in camps in Bangladesh. Many of them were raped, most saw loved ones killed, thousands arrived wounded. All are traumatized. Here in this corner of Bangladesh is one of the most densely populated areas of PTSD affected and depressed people on earth.
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#inmyworld is designed to expose the challenges faced by people living with #mentalhealth issues and give them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to improve life for excluded groups by amplifying their stories. This work was made in collaboration with Médecins Sans Frontières @doctorswithoutborders who provide mental health support to the refugees and local population. To see more or to share your own mental health story please follow @onedayinmyworld


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Witness Change

Rohingya refugee camp. The Rohingya people are one of the most persecuted minority groups in the world. Following a concerted campaign of extreme violence by the Myanmar authorities against Rohingya people in Myanmar’s Rakhine State in August 2017, at least 700,000 Rohingya fled over the border into Cox’s Bazar District, Bangladesh. Living conditions in the Cox’s Bazar refugee camps, now the largest in the world, are dire. Many people lack access to clean water, sanitation, health care and shelter. The mental and psychosocial impact of not just being forcibly displaced, but also the difficult conditions of the camp, continue to affect the Rohingya refugees.
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Last August, “ethnic cleansing” perpetrated by the Myanmar military against the Rohingya sparked a massive refugee crisis. Nearly a million Rohingya – those who escaped the flames and executions – are now living in camps in Bangladesh. Many of them were raped, most saw loved ones killed, thousands arrived wounded. All are traumatized. Here in this corner of Bangladesh is one of the most densely populated areas of PTSD affected and depressed people on earth.
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#inmyworld is designed to expose the challenges faced by people living with #mentalhealth issues and give them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to improve life for excluded groups by amplifying their stories. This work was made in collaboration with Médecins Sans Frontières @doctorswithoutborders who provide mental health support to the refugees and local population. To see more or to share your own mental health story please follow @onedayinmyworld


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Witness Change

“Most times, I feel for a woman and I most times get a woman to satisfy myself. I am married for three years, and I have never come out to my family or my husband.” A.K. is a bisexual woman from Ghana. Her family is strongly religious and she would be in danger to tell them her sexuality. “But I won't deny that I love my husband that I'm staying with. And the woman that I also have sexual intercourse with, I also love her. I don't know, I just love them both. So I know I am, I won't say it's a mistake”.”
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In #Ghana, only a brave few dare show their face and publicly say they identify as LGBTQI+, most live in the shadows fearing discrimination, hatred and violence if they lived openly.
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Where Love is Illegal traveled to Kenya, Mozambique and Ghana with the support of Elton John AIDS Foundation (@ejaf) to continue our work sharing LGBTQI+ stories of survival and to raise awareness of the impacts of stigma. Around the world, grants made by the Elton John AIDS Foundation make possible the work of countless community-rooted organizations that touch the lives of millions every day. For more information, and to join the fight, visit www.ejaf.org
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Click the link in our profile to see how to share your own experience of #survival and #discrimination and learn how you can support. Photo by @Hammond_Robin. This is a @witness_change project. For more stories of survival follow @WhereLoveIsIllegal #loveislove


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Witness Change

On #WorldAidsDay2018 we remember our friend Marcel, who lost his life earlier this year. Marcel was a healthcare advocate who worked hard to make sure Ghanian LGBTQI+ people had knowledge and access to remain health and safe. Marcel himself was HIV+. Unlike most people we spoke to who were positive, Marcel wanted to show his face, hoping to reduce the stigma associated with living positive. He remains our hero.
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“My junior brothers and my parents do suspect me, but I always find a way to educate them on my sexual life. They don't really feel comfortable, but my Dad and Mum said they love me who I am and accept me the way I am.” Marcel. Ghana. Died June 2018.
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In #Ghana, only a brave few dare show their face and publicly say they identify as LGBTQI+, most live in the shadows fearing discrimination, hatred and violence if they lived openly.
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Where Love is Illegal traveled to Kenya, Mozambique and Ghana with the support of Elton John AIDS Foundation (@ejaf @ejafdn) to continue our work sharing LGBTQ+ stories of survival and to raise awareness of the impacts of stigma. Around the world, grants made by the Elton John AIDS Foundation make possible the work of countless community-rooted organizations that touch the lives of millions every day. For more information, and to join the fight, visit www.ejaf.org
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Photo by @Hammond_Robin. This is a @witness_change project. For more stories follow @WhereLoveIsIllegal


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Witness Change

In Bangladesh @onedayinmyworld hosted a storytelling workshop with Rohingya Refugees where they captured the good and the bad of the camp. Watch the video to see some of the work they created and support @witness_change to continue work like this by donating at the link in our profile. // On #GivingTuesday we are raising money to help groups who struggle to have their voice heard tell their own stories. @WitnessChange believes stories should come from the community, not be about the community. To accomplish this we have hosted three storytelling workshops in 2018. In these workshops participants from the community have learned visual storytelling techniques to show us the world they experience. The images and video they create show a perspective outside media could never see. In 2019 we will run six workshops...but this can only happen with your help. Each week-long workshop costs $5,000 to run. We currently have a budget for just two. We hope that on this Giving Tuesday you can help us achieve our goal of of creating stories that come from the community.


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Witness Change

On #GivingTuesday we are raising money to help groups who struggle to have their voice heard tell their own stories. Donate at the link in our profile.
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@WitnessChange believes stories should come from the community, not be about the community. To accomplish this we have hosted three storytelling workshops in 2018. In these workshops participants from the community have learned visual storytelling techniques to show us the world they experience. The images and video they create show a perspective outside media could never see. In 2019 we will run six workshops...but this can only happen with your help. Each week-long workshop costs $5,000 to run. We currently have a budget for just two. We hope that on this Giving Tuesday you can help us achieve our goal of of creating stories that come from the community.


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Witness Change

Five year-old Yeasamin Akter fled from her village in Myanmar with her mother, 25 year old Fatima Khatun, and her four month-old sister Tawhid Uddin. “The military people were torturing people,” Fatima says. She and her children were forced to leave when the military started burning the houses in their village. When the fire reached their house, Yeasamin was still inside. Fatima rushed to her when she heard her screaming. She saved Yeasamin from the flames but not before her leg and buttocks were badly burnt. In the refugee camp, “there is no peace as we don’t have our own land, our own people, and our country,” says Fatima.
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Last August, “ethnic cleansing” perpetrated by the Myanmar military against the Rohingya sparked a massive refugee crisis. Nearly a million Rohingya – those who escaped the flames and executions – are now living in camps in Bangladesh. Many of them were raped, most saw loved ones killed, thousands arrived wounded. All are traumatized. Here in this corner of Bangladesh is one of the most densely populated areas of PTSD affected and depressed people on earth.
//
#inmyworld is designed to expose the challenges faced by people living with #mentalhealth issues and give them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to improve life for excluded groups by amplifying their stories. This work was made in collaboration with Médecins Sans Frontières @doctorswithoutborders who provide mental health support to the refugees and local population. To see more or to share your own mental health story please follow @onedayinmyworld


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Witness Change

“I always hate to share my story because it brings back sad memories and makes me feel very down. I have faced a lot of violence, mob attacks, police cases because of my sexuality, rejection from landlords, family rejecting me as a terror.” Pearl is a transgender man from Ghana. In 2009, he was nearly burned alive, targeted by mob justice for his perceived sexuality. His father saved him, however he sent Pearl to prayer camp to try and “cure” Pearl. At the camp Pearl was physically attacked and raped. He escaped the camp and now used his experience to help others. “I am happy to be a trans man, an activist, and a mentor to the LGBT community.”
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Today, 20 November, is Transgender Day of Remembrance #TDOR in honor of those who lost their lives in the face of bigotry and transphobia. Pearl survived the attack, but still lives with the threat of transphobic violence.
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Where Love is Illegal traveled to Kenya, Mozambique and Ghana with the support of Elton John AIDS Foundation (@ejaf) to continue our work sharing LGBTQI+ stories of survival and to raise awareness of the impacts of stigma. Around the world, grants made by the Elton John AIDS Foundation make possible the work of countless community-rooted organizations that touch the lives of millions every day. For more information, and to join the fight, visit www.ejaf.org
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Click the link in our profile to read Daniel’s story and to see how to share your own experience of #survival and #discrimination and learn how you can support. Photo by @Hammond_Robin / @noorimages. This is a @witness_change project. For more stories of survival follow @WhereLoveIsIllegal #loveislove #transisbeautiful


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Witness Change

"I identify as a queer man of transgender experience and I specifically say a queer man of transgender experience and not a transman because we are very sexist in our society and we feel that by virtue of being trans we are less than a man or less than a woman than a cisgender individual I don’t always want to have the label of transgender attached because then it becomes kind of very scientific and its very fetishized- its uncomfortable and annoying and demeaning so I’m a man just like any other and I don’t want to be treated differently because I’m trans and I especially hate when you try to point out my biological sex and try to refute my claim to manhood you do not get to choose who is a man and who isn’t" F.J. (@to_gentleman) is a man of transgender experience from Jamaica.
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As part of #transgenderawarenessweek, we are sharing stories of the transgender men and women who have lived through discrimination and continue to make their voices heard.
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Click the link in our profile to see how to share your own experience of #survival and #discrimination and learn how you can support. Photo by @Hammond_Robin / @noorimages. This is a @witness_change project. For more stories of survival follow @WhereLoveIsIllegal #loveislove #transisbeautiful


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